Tag: Sonakshi Sinha

Movie Review: ‘Noor’

By Subhash Jha

Though I couldn’t relate to her endless boozing and snoozing, Noor Roy Choudhary as played by Sonakshi Sinha, is someone I’ve known in passing. And that’s I would keep her if I met her. At a safe distance.

‘Noor’ is not one of the best films on journalistic ethics. It doesn’t do to the contemporary Mumbai media world what the Paul Newman-Sally Field starrer Absence Of Malice did 30 years ago. It pricks at the conscience in a rather undemanding way. ‘Noor’ takes sly and slender satirical swipes at sensationalism in journalism, more delectable for its many jibes than the actual prick at the conscience.
The prick, when it comes, is not as solidly impact-filled as it should be. But by then, Noor has established her credentials for being an aimless adrift television journalist looking for a sense of purpose. That purpose’ kind of falls into her lap with a gentle thud. Of course Noor messes it up. This is her prized USP, the ability to be absolutely and candidly self-serving without being apologetic about. She messes up and moves on.
Director Suhnil Sippy whose last feature film, the snappy and slick Snip came 17 years ago, doesn’t skip a beat. He allows his vision to meander with Noor’s sense of aimlessness, trailing her through endless drinking binges and a never-ending quota of bacchanalia with her two friends Saad (Kannan Gill) and Zara (Shibani Dandekar).
While Kannan Gill definitely needs elocution classes, Dandekar is delightfully saucy specially in the scene where she walks in to a bar to slap a man who has betrayed her best friend. I wanted to see more of her. More of Noor’s editor’s no-nonsense socialite wife played by Suchitra Pillai. And yes , more of Noor’s boss played by the ever-excellent Manish Choudhary. The last time I saw a female journalist share such tactile vibes with her boss it was in Rajkumar Gupta’s ‘No One Killed Jessica’.
Sonakshi Sinha gamely plunges into the mediaperson’s home ‘groan’ zone, mining into Noor’s insecurities and inadequacies to come up with a character who is as real as any neo-realistic urban character, like, say Alia Bhatt in Gauri Shinde’s ‘Dear Zindagi’. Like Alia, Sonakshi is not afraid to address her character’s uncertainties about her body and sexual activities.
This is a coming-of-age yarn that joyfully gets into the head and bed of its heroine, deconstructs the hoary Hindi Film Heroine, highlighting her appetites, culinary or otherwise, in ways that were considered inappropriate until a decade ago. Whatever ‘Noor’ does, she does with an unabashed ebullience where she can and often does, trip and fall on her nose.
And when Noor falls in love she really falls. The segment showing her growing attraction to a rakish photojournalist (played with splendid suaveness by Purab Kohli) is brief and brilliant. The fit of heated passion subsides quickly. This is one of the film’s prominent attributes. It rakes up issues and then quickly moves to something else.
Perhaps this mood swing in the narrative replicates the film’s protagonist’s restless energy which is killing her professional skills while destroying her personal relationships.
Sonakshi Sinha kills it, even as her character claims Mumbai is killing her. Her monologue on the smog, smut, corruption and heartbreak of Mumbai is indeed a highlight. Sonakshi throws in her weight with her character’s fight to float above the metropolis’ rising sewage level of moral turpitude.
The flow of conversational energy is the key to the narrative’s efficacy. Ishita Moitra’s dialogues add ample zest warmth and humour to Saba Imtiaz’s skimpy novel about the socio-political awakening ofA an aimless reporter. In director Sunhil Sippy’s hands, “Noor” is a lot more. It’s about the media and sensationalism, the city and the single girl.
It’s about ‘Noor’ and her friends and her father (played by veteran M K Raina, delightful) and her cat, and her conscience. Sunhil Sippy packs it all in, leaving enough breathing space for the characters to acquire a life of their own. (IANS)

Trailer for ‘Noor’ Released Amidst Fanfare

The trailer and poster of Sonakshi Sinha starrer ‘Noor’ was released in Mumbai today. Sonakshi is playing the role of a journalist which is seen as her attempt to take new and challenging roles. 

Directed by Sunhil Sippy, ‘Noor’ is believed to be based on Pakistani author Saba Imtiaz’s ‘Karachi, You’re Killing Me!’. Check out the trailer here:

Movie Review: ‘Joker’ (Zero Star)

(By Akshat Sharma)This week’s Bollywood release ‘Joker’ is a cruel joke on cine goers. The movie is so pathetic and lame that you start wondering what on earth made Akshay Kumar and Sonakshi Sinha sign this disaster. Director Shirish Kunder’s misadventure called ‘Joker’ will go down in the history of Indian cinema as one of the most appalling films to watch.

It is a movie about aliens and to be honest any attempt by Indian filmmakers to make another ‘ ET’ is nothing but suicidal. Neither do we have the resources nor the technology to make a believable film on aliens in India.

‘Joker’ opens in a village aptly named Pagalpur. This village actually does not exist on the map as it went off the radar during the British Raj. A scientist-hero comes into picture who wants to contact aliens. He makes a plan and whole Paglapur gets involved in it.

The script showcases an array of bizarre characters who launch a torrid attack on your brain cells. The film meanders aimlessly till the end and you fail to understand what exactly is going around. ‘Joker’ has not a single funny joke to offer as all the jokes in movie make fun of your commonsense.

After watching the movie you are left in a state of comatose. No point in discussing the movie further because it is not even worth criticising this dysfunctional film. Shrish Kunder, if possible, should be banned from making such movies and the audience should be saved from the mental agony of watching such disasters.

Actress Chitrangada Singh’s hip shaking number ‘Kaafiraana’ is the only relief which you get in this more than two hours long horror called ‘Joker’.

Movie Review: ‘Rowdy Rathore’ (** Two Star)

‘Rowdy Rathore’ races on the premise that heroes are made by circumstances, not design. That’s how the street-smart Shiva ends up in a town run by garish goons, where homes, humans and hopes are burnt in effigies mocking human rights.It is an old-fashioned good-versus-evil comedy-action-drama with paisa-vasool written in every frame.

Prabhu Deva, who earlier directed Salman Khan’s cop-on-a-rampage saga ‘Wanted’ puts Akshay on the same page. To his credit, Akshay manages to create his own world in that Salman-space. Never letting go of that twinkle in his eye, Akshay sinks his crooked teeth into the meaty double role with the warmth, affection and relish of a dinner guest who knows all the yummy dishes on the table have been cooked only for him.

Akshay goes for the sumptuous meal with the hunger of a man who may not see tomorrow. It’s high-octane performance full of warmth and fury, never over-the-top, even when all hell breaks loose.

The thing about ‘Rowdy Rathore’ is it never takes itself seriously. The cop and his double won’t kow-tow to the powers-that-be. Ironically, the film grandly bows its head to the Great Bollywood Formula. The dialogues are bombastic, bordering on the corny, nevertheless fun in their intended ideological inferences.

A profound reverence for every trick in the book of filmic formulas sees the accelerated narration to its breathless finale. Even when the going gets gory, there is a tongue-in-cheek humour in the violence.

It’s not the arrogant aggression of Salman in ‘Dabangg’ or ‘Wanted’. In ‘Rowdy Rathore’, Akshay creates a new language of heroic aggression. He is goofy, wonky, clumsy and oafish. He has no respect for the rules of the office. But his character loves doing what he does, because a man has got to do what he has to do, and really someone has to do the dirty job of cleaning up the mess we’ve created.

Metal rods from rickety machines are wrenched out and used to teach the anti-socials a lesson. The ‘ouch’ is never unwelcome. Akshay creates a ‘no wince’ situation.

Whether its wooing a Patna girl (Sonakshi Sinha) all over Mumbai streets and right into a wedding venue, or in the second half, taking on the vile villainy of a self-appointed lord of diabolism named Baapji (Nasser), who is so uncouth, unwashed and unmannered that he is downright funny in his obscene rowdyism.

The generous splash of colour and music (Sajid-Wajid at their peppy pinnacle) pitches the film at a massy level without toppling over into a revolting rowdyism.

Formulistic cinema has never been celebrated with more gusto.

‘Rowdy Rathore’ revives the years of Eastman colour cinema in the 1960s and 1970s, when movies were crazily colourful and rollicking fun, when you knew the villains would get their cacaphonic come-uppance.

Pulling out all stops to give us a spicy meal, Prabhu Deva succeeds in putting a dizzying spin into Akshay’s double-role act. Twirling his moustache in Rajputana pride, romancing the spirited small-town chick or beating up 23 goons with one weapon (self-determination), Akshay delivers a performance that makes you want to jump out of your seat, clapping, whistling and cheering in appreciation.

While the fights are brilliantly conceived and executed, it’s Akshay’s courtship with Sonakshi that had me giggling non-stop. If he is outrageously coy in his wooing act, Sonakshi gives him tit-for-tat, matching steps with her far more experienced co-star, never letting the age difference daunt her.

The rest of the cast only has to stand around to extol and cheer our down-to-earth superhero cop. All the while, the narration never loses its tempo, warmth or humour.

The choreography ensures that the dances merge with seamless elan into the action.

‘Rowdy Rathore’ is quite a gravity-defying feat. It often finds the villains being hurled into the air. But the narration manages to keep its feet on the ground. Really, Akshay as the angry cop is more entertaining than intimidating.

Three cheers for producer Sanjay Leela Bhansali for coming out of his comfort zone to celebrate the spirit of Hindi commercial cinema at its dizziest and craziest.

(IANS)

Bumper Box Office Opening For ‘Rowdy Rathore’

The Box Office of Rs 15.10 crore on the opening day  and weekend projections indicate that the Akshay Kumar and Sonakshi Sinha starrer ‘Rowdy Rathore’ is on its way to become a super hit. Film trade analyst Taran Adarsh in his tweet declared ‘Rowdy Rathore’ the third biggest opener ever.

Superstar Akshay Kumar is the biggest beneficiary of this huge opening. He clearly has recovered his star power by giving back to back hits in the past 10 month. ‘Rowdy Rathore’s roaring success is a testimony that people in India will always watch a typical Bollywood masala flick.

After ‘Agneepath’ and ‘Bodyguard’, ‘Rowdy Rathore’ has grabbed the third spot in the list of  movies which enjoyed the highest opening ever.